most common fasteners used in mechanical assemblies are bolts, nuts and screws. Bolts usually (but not always) have hexa- gonal heads, as do nuts. Screws usually (again, but not always) have round heads and a slot or other recess to accommodate the appropriate driver tool. Nuts and bolts are most often tightened and loosened using wrenches, sockets and nut drivers; likewise, screws are driven tight or loosened using screwdrivers. There are myriad varieties of these tools and each have uses at which they excel. Let's explore these tools and what they're used for now.
most common fasteners used in mechanical assemblies are bolts, nuts and screws. Bolts usually (but not always) have hexa- gonal heads, as do nuts. Screws usually (again, but not always) have round heads and a slot or other recess to accommodate the appropriate driver tool. Nuts and bolts are most often tightened and loosened using wrenches, sockets and nut drivers; likewise, screws are driven tight or loosened using screwdrivers. There are myriad varieties of these tools and each have uses at which they excel. Let's explore these tools and what they're used for now.
most common fasteners used in mechanical assemblies are bolts, nuts and screws. Bolts usually (but not always) have hexa- gonal heads, as do nuts. Screws usually (again, but not always) have round heads and a slot or other recess to accommodate the appropriate driver tool. Nuts and bolts are most often tightened and loosened using wrenches, sockets and nut drivers; likewise, screws are driven tight or loosened using screwdrivers. There are myriad varieties of these tools and each have uses at which they excel. Let's explore these tools and what they're used for now.
most common fasteners used in mechanical assemblies are bolts, nuts and screws. Bolts usually (but not always) have hexa- gonal heads, as do nuts. Screws usually (again, but not always) have round heads and a slot or other recess to accommodate the appropriate driver tool. Nuts and bolts are most often tightened and loosened using wrenches, sockets and nut drivers; likewise, screws are driven tight or loosened using screwdrivers. There are myriad varieties of these tools and each have uses at which they excel. Let's explore these tools and what they're used for now.
month in Part 1 of Holding Fast we covered the various bolt types, the difference between bolts and screws, and we went into nuts and washers. This month our primer on fasteners continues, starting with the subject of coarseness. HOW FINE IS COARSE? Good question! Essentially, a thread is an inclined plane cut along the surface of a fast- ener. Varying the anle of the plane determines the cut or thread: increasing the angle pro- duces a coarse thread, while decreasing it re-
recap, in Part 1 we discussed the various bolt types, the difference between bolts and screws, then we went into nuts and washers; in Part 2 we covered fine vs. coarse threads, hardness, torque and head bolt markings. This month, in our final installment of our primer on fasteners, we cover other types of fasteners used frequently on Corvettes and in the garage. OTHER FASTENERS While threaded fasteners are the
month in Part 1 of Holding Fast we covered the various bolt types, the difference between bolts and screws, and we went into nuts and washers. This month our primer on fasteners continues, starting with the subject of coarseness. HOW FINE IS COARSE? Good question! Essentially, a thread is an inclined plane cut along the surface of a fast- ener. Varying the anle of the plane determines the cut or thread: increasing the angle pro- duces a coarse thread, while decreasing it re-
recap, in Part 1 we discussed the various bolt types, the difference between bolts and screws, then we went into nuts and washers; in Part 2 we covered fine vs. coarse threads, hardness, torque and head bolt markings. This month, in our final installment of our primer on fasteners, we cover other types of fasteners used frequently on Corvettes and in the garage. OTHER FASTENERS While threaded fasteners are the
often surprised at how naïve non-Corvette owners are when it comes to the subject of rust. “Corvettes are made of fiberglass – they don’t rust, do they?” is a comment I’ve heard many, many times over the years. What these people evidently don’t consider is that, while the bodies of Corvettes aren’t subject to rust, lots of other components that are made of steel – particularly on the older generations – like the chassis, suspension components, springs, bumper mounts, steering linkage, control arms and so forth are subject to rusting. There’s just no getting away from the fact that any time you’re dealing with ferrous metals – iron, tin, steel – rust is bound to be a problem if the metal isn’t covered with some sort of protective coating to keep air and moisture from reaching it and causing oxidation (rust).
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oil is literally the lifeblood of your engine and, because of this, it should never be taken lightly. Maintaining the proper oil level and changing it regularly more than any other single thing will preserve the life, power and integrity of your engine. Regardless of whether you're running a newer C4, C5 or C6 that uses synthetic motor oil or an older Corvette that utilizes traditional petroleum-based oil, making sure that the oil is clean and still has the proper viscosity is essential. Viscosity, or the thickness of the oil, is directly related to the oil's lubricity (ability to lubricate) and eliminate friction between the moving parts. The point here is that as oil gets old it loses its viscosity, with the main destructive forces being heat and oxidation. So even if you don't use your Corvette much, it's still a good idea to change the oil and filter at regular intervals to make sure the oil is fresh and has sufficient viscosity to do its vital job of protecting your motor.