Pirelli run-flats on stock chrome C5 wheels provide the rolling power, with black powder- coated calipers handling the whoa-power.
THE DANGERS OF PUMPING ETHANOL
Most new vehicles are constructed with materials that resist ethanol’s potentially harmful properties hen small concentrations of the biofuel are used, such as 10% ethanol by volume (E10). However, that is not the case with older cars and current high-performance specialty parts. Condensation created by this gasoline can damage engines and result in corrosion, rust, clogging and deterioration of fuel-system components. The U.S. Congress enacted the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) in 2005 and then set ambitious man- dates for the amount of ethanol to be blended into gaso- line each year, going from 9 billion gallons in 2008 to 36 billion gallons by 2022. In order to meet the ever- growing RFS biofuel mandate, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently permitted the sale of 15% ethanol (E15) in gasoline. In the process, the EPA acknowledged that E15 poses a risk to older cars and therefore made it “illegal” to fuel pre-’01 vehicles. However, the agency is only requiring a gasoline- pump warning label to alert motorists that E15 could potentially cause equipment failure in older vehicles. The EPA’s decision has spawned a huge battle across America. A coalition of unlikely partners has come together to fight E15. They include organizations such as the SEMA Action Network (SAN) representing collector cars and their owners, along with the boating industry, lawn-equipment manufacturers and the oil industry. It also includes the food industry (corn prices are increasing as a portion of the crop is being diverted to fuel) and environmentalists (the land, transportation and energy costs to produce ethanol undermine the benefits).
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THE DANGERS OF PUMPING ETHANOL